Fly Tying · Tips and Tricks

Fly tying tips and tricks: “Keeping mayfly tails separated”

When it comes to dry flies, nothing looks better than the proper proportions, standing at attention to the point that the fly looks like it has a life of its own sitting on your desk top. Balancing, almost hovering, on nothing more than a tail and hackle.

..but like many things we learn to do, that’s not always the case in the beginning. When not properly supported, tailing material has a tendency to follow the bend of the hook and will continue to point downward once more material is added on.

During one of the fly tying shows I stopped over to watch Matt and Tim from Tightline Video tying flies at their booth, and they had shown me a trick that I would like to now share with you. (If you are familiar with their YouTube channel you may have seen this there as well)

Before you start, cut a section of thread off your bobbin a few inches in length, and put it aside. Then start your thread and grab those microfibetts!

Advertisements
Fly Tying · Tips and Tricks

Fly tying tips and tricks: “How to prep tying material that contains a center cord, to prevent excess bulk.”

Chenille is a common material used when it comes to woolly buggers, a fly in which I tie by the dozen since you can fish them all year. But materials like this with an inner thread cord can create a bulking issue when tying in without prep.

An inner cord means its a separate material that is wrapped around a cord or thread which is when wrapped around the hook. Estaz and chenille are common center corded materials.

If you are currently having this trouble here’s a quick tip that will eliminate that problem.

First let’s take a look at what happens when you tie it in without any modification.

Fly Tying · Material Talk · On The Vise: Q&A · Tips and Tricks

On The Vise Q&A: “Jig/Slotted Beads: The proper way to fit them on the hook.”

I tie on jigs a lot, so much so that it’s become almost automatic when reaching for a hook. They are great for nymphing, will sink deep with a tungsten bead and extra weight under the body and ride with the hook point up on a tight line. Translating into less hangups as you are high sticking through the riffles.

Not to say that I dont still use standard nymph hooks with brass beads when I am going to be fishing skinnier water, and need to opt for something lighter that wont barrel straight down through the water column; It’s just that I cant seem to keep myself away from them.

While I may never really know what it is that makes them so attractive to look at, what I do know, is that one question I am asked the most when demonstrating or tying At a show, is:

“How do I get those slotted beads to sit right?!? It doesn’t work. What am I doing wrong?”

Fly Tying · Fly Tying Q&A · On The Vise: Q&A · Tips and Tricks

On the vise Q&A: Part 2-“Too much hackle, not enough hook. More techniques for utilizing oversized soft hackle.”

Last week we discussed two ways you can utilize an oversized feather when it comes to tying with soft hackles, and today we are going to look at two more. These two methods listed below are my favorites and while one is rather quick, the other allows you to mix it up a bit. Lets take a look!

“The Flying V”

While I have no idea what this technique is normally called, or where it came from originally; what I do know, is that I have seen it used many times by many different people, and I am always amazed at how quick and effective it is. I have also added a YouTube link at the end to a video by Craig Matthews on this technique, in case you need a moving visual.

Fly Tying · Fly Tying Q&A · On The Vise: Q&A · Tips and Tricks

On the vise Q&A- “Too much hackle, not enough hook. Techniques to shorten those soft hackle fibers.”

Anyone who has spoken to me during a presentation, while tying at a show or on the water, knows that I love tying, fishing and talking; soft hackles. If they didn’t know it at first, they learn rather quickly, seeing as though my caffeine fueled ramblings have a tendency to veer in that direction mid conversation without warning.

It’s an addiction! So much so, that in the middle of tying something else, I seem to glance over to where I had previously left a partridge or starling skin, look left and right like I am doing something wrong, abandon my current pattern and move over to my husbands vise! Tie one or two, and then hop back over to my side and continue what I was doing.

Oh what a great addiction to have!

The other side to this, is that no matter how much I love tying and admiring a handful soft hackles where everything is seemingly perfect, doing everything I can to recreate the fly to my liking and bettering myself at the techniques; the bottom line is that soft hackles fish just as good on a first cast as they do after 5 fish. The more chewed up the better they become! The fibers are all over the place, floss is frayed and you’re still hooking fish with the lifelike appearance that they give, even with those materials all askew!

Fly Tying · On the Vise · PHWFF Fly Tying · Tips and Tricks

On My Vise:”New Year, New Me?” How about I just stick with a new tutorial to an old technique! 😂 The LaFontaine Cased Caddis 

It’s 2017!

How does that old saying go?

“New Year, New me”?

Well I’ll tell you what.. Seeing as though I won’t be whipping up any resolutions for consuming less bacon or coffee, and will more than likely just spend the rest of the new year, as usual, crossing out 2016 on everything I write because it’s now 2017.. 😂

What I do know, is that there’s never a bad time to try a new technique in regards to fly tying.

A few weeks back I posted a fly pattern for the LaFontaine Deep Sparkle Pupae, and after going through some tips to palmer hackle on a fly such as the wooly bugger, I decided that there’s no better way to start the new year than with a technique that may have been forgotten in these new times.

Fly Tying · Tips and Tricks

Fly tying tips and tricks: The “Slide Loop” technique for those aggravating materials!

The “Slide Loop” Technique

We all have certain materials that have a tendency to drive us a little crazy. Materials that don’t want to cooperate when we attempt to tie them in, and in some cases, the pinch wrap just wont cut it. You may find that flash material, rubber legs and even laser dubbing that are some of those culprits that are giving us a problem.

One minute you’re trying to tie in a few small strands and next thing you know the flash is kinked, the legs are snapped or pulling out and you’ve accomplished nothing but a mess.

I am going to show you a quick trick that will help you get a handle on them.

*A few things to keep in mind*

The way this technique works is that where-ever your thread has stopped, is where your material is going to land when you slide it up; so be sure that you are beginning this technique where you would like for it to be tied in place. One other point I wanted to make is that you will be doubling over your material, so if you are looking for your fly to have two rubber legs in that area; you will only need one piece of material.

Fly Tying · Fly Tying Q&A · On The Vise: Q&A · Tips and Tricks

On The Vise Q & A- “Quill Bodies- Part 2: The importance of a uniform underbody, tutorial with troubleshooting”

If there’s one thing a fly Tyer knows all too well, it’s how quickly a well-intentioned fly can immediately look like crap, due to a thread underbody that is not uniformly wrapped.

The underbody can be a very overlooked step, and when done in a hurry with haste is something that your final product will reflect.

Fly Tying · Fly Tying Q&A · Material Talk · On The Vise: Q&A · Tips and Tricks

On The Vise Q & A- “How to Wrap a Polish Quill with Troubleshooting Tips”

With these quills You can tie a variety of sizes, and depending on what you’re tying you can usually go as big as a size 12, but that will vary on your fly tying style (such as; is that size 12 or 10 going to have a hackle in front to take up the slack where the quill ends? Are you using a bead? Ect)

It’s also is based on the size and thickness of each quill that comes in a package.For the most part they are uniform, but they aren’t synthetic, which is why there will be a tiny variation between them.
Some flies you tie may require a solid body with very minimal segmentation. If that’s the case then just tie them in the “wrong” way.

It’s all up to you and what you’re wishing to achieve. But I use the term “wrong” very loosely; since your right- may be someones wrong. Which is why I am making this tutorial to help you reach the results that you are looking for, when it comes to tying with polish quills. *I receive a lot of questions about this technique, at shows and online; and some people are telling me that no matter how they do it it still comes out wrong.

So here’s my advice: if you tie this in as per the first few steps and it still isn’t working to your liking/cant figure out why its still wrapping upside down- then scroll down and see my troubleshooting tip. This is why, depending on your style of tying -are you an “over the material” or “to the side of the material” wrapper- it’s not set in stone on how to do this. (This may seem confusing but It will make more sense when you see this step-by-step as it was also demonstrated here -when working with turkey biots.)

Fly Tying · Material Talk · On The Vise: Q&A · Tips and Tricks

On The Vise:Q & A “Substitute material for wild type brown/Iso Soft Hackle”

I had a question from Vicky who I met last year while doing a soft hackle presentation at the Anglers Den, about where to find the wild type brown and what to use as a substitute. The Whiting Wild type brown is one of my favorite all around dark brown hackles but its mostly reserved… Continue reading On The Vise:Q & A “Substitute material for wild type brown/Iso Soft Hackle”