Everything Else · Idle Hands · quilting

Idle Hands: “My contribution to a mini quilt swap”

A Quilters guild that I had been a member of before I moved, had a large number of quilters who lived all across the United States. During one of our meetings I heard that we had a sign up sheet for a mini quilt swap. I decided to join and see what I could come up with, then I realized that it was a secret swap in which you had no contact to your recipient until you finished. We were all given the Instagram name of our partner and had to go off of clues they left you there or just come up with your own idea.

Fly Tying

On My Vise: “The Bass Agitator”

Before I began fly fishing I had been spin fishing since the age of 3, (and I’m not ashamed to say.. sometimes I still do! That’s right I said that disgusting phrase! 😂Oh no! How could she Sometimes I take a spinning rod out on a dock during a full moon and I start casting jitterbugs for largemouth for the whole world to see and just dont care?! 😂)

I am a bass fisher-woman at heart, and old habits die hard. I only started fishing for the ‘other’😂species of trout about 3 years ago when had a lull in between ice fishing and bass fishing. As much as I love this new world of learning what goes on in the world of trout, my heart still lives within the confines of those lily pad laden lakes and ponds.

When I fell in love with fly tying and began to come up with flies for bass, I couldn’t just forget everything I had taught myself with that spinning reel, so instead; I incorporated my old techniques in regards to how I tied and fished my flies. I tried to imitate my favorite go-to lures, with one of them being a very lightweight 4″ suspending jerkbait. Those lures are excellent at pissing off bass on their beds and also in cold water when they are still sluggish. The Bass Agitator is the fly I use in replace of a suspending jerkbait, and it produces well when stripped and paused veryyy slowly.

Fly Tying · PHWFF Meetings · PHWFF New City

PHWFF April 26, 2017 Meeting Recap – Michael takes over the evening with an Adams! ..or Gray Wulff..? or.. comparaduns..? or..”

I couldn’t make it to our April 26th meeting but our newest volunteer Michael Signorelli took over for me and the guys had an awesome time!

“We had a full house at the April 26th meeting, which took place a few days before our trip up to the Upper Delaware system. The guides told us to tie up some Adams in preparation. But, guess what, we tied some Gray Wulff variations instead. It was perhaps a fitting choice, since Lee Wulff created the fly in the Catskills almost 90 years ago. The group learned a few tricks when it comes to tying wings on a Wulff. [As we progressed through the steps, some of the tyers morphed the pattern into Comparaduns, Bombers, and even a Neversink Skater.] It was a very productive session that turned out a few very decent flies. Spirits were high at the end of the night. And the trip up to the Catskills promises to be a classic. ” -Michael Signorelli

Fly Tying · On the Vise

On My Vise: The March Brown Floating Nymph

Spring has arrived in the Catskills, and that means the hatches are coming! This also means that many mayflies which are in the process of emerging.. just aren’t going to make it. They’ll either get stuck in that shuck and drown, or become picked off by a hungry trout. That’s why emerging flies are so effective when fished with a little movement, or even just a slight twitch in the line every so often.

The floating nymph has been around for quite a number of years, but I became aware of this specific pattern while reading through “The Dettes: A Catskill Legend” by Eric Leiser. Its an excellent book, loaded with history and trout patters. You can read more about my review of the book “here” and be sure to stop by to see Bryn and Joe at Dette Trout Flies and grab a copy the next time you’re in Roscoe!

Fly Tying · On the Vise

On My Vise: “The Starry Eyed Crawdad”

These cold months once again have me dreaming of sitting in my boat in the sun, doing a little smallmouth bass fishing. A few weeks ago I posted a step-by-step for The Smallmouth Sparkle Grub and today I’d like to share with you one more great smallmouth fly.

Crayfish change color throughout the year, and there is no shortage of reasoning behind this. For example: During a molt a crayfish will change colors, you can find them anywhere from the olive/brown camouflage with blue to a red/orange. Depending on your location the colors may vary again, on top of that it also depends on their vitamin intake, and what microscopic organisms they are ingesting. Darker color/muddy waters will also change this color as well, so tying them in assorted colors is a good choice.

This is why this pattern is so versatile, because all you need to do is change the colors and size to match them throughout the year. I will get into more detail on the life-cycle and habits of crayfish in a later post, but for now just know that this pattern is a must have for the summer months!

Fly Tying · PHWFF Meetings · PHWFF New City

PHWFF February 22,2017- Meeting Recap for New City, NY: “Rod Building, A Speech by Bill , Charlie’s Flies and a new volunteer!”

Our PHWFF New City meeting on February 22, 2017 was a busy one!
Half the room was filled with participants who were working on their rods for the Competition and the other half was set up for our fly tying group.

Fly Tying · On the Vise

Leave room for The Renegades!

While we often find ourselves up late at night, coffee in hand, trying to create flies that imitate the exact naturals, so as to bring those picky trout to our nets. But we must not forget about another group of flies; flies that become such fun to tie and fish once they grace our memory with their existence again. Flies which merely suggest movement or a commotion on the waters surface, flies that only mimic the insects ‘footprint’ on the water but never really imitating the physical carbon copy of that food source.

We have seen this work time and time again with a Griffiths gnat, the Usual and a White Wulff, but they aren’t the only great attractor patterns. The Renegade is absolutely one of those! This fly was developed somewhere around the late 20s early 30s, and still catches trout today.
When I first started fishing The Renegade I didn’t know it had a name. It had actually found its way to me, during one of my first trips to the Catskills. I saw it hanging on a low tree branch on the bank of the Beaverkill, still attached to a few inches of sun-faded tippet. The hook was bent and had begun showing signs of rust around the eye. Yet at the time, I remember thinking.. “.. if they fished it here maybe it will work here?” (HA! If only that was true of every fly we tied on!) Nevertheless I took it home, dismantled it and tried my best to copy it on my vise.

That wet fly proved to be quite effective on many trips as I continued to tie and fish it.

Fly Tying · On the Vise

‘Orange’ you glad it’s Monday? No? Then maybe a few of my favorite hot spots will help to cheer you up.

If Monday’s just aren’t your thing, then maybe be a few of my favorite orange hotspot flies will help to get rid of that case of the Mondays.

I’m not sure exactly what it is about the color orange that seems to be so effective for so many of us, but time and time again it’s a color that I have found myself using quite often.On top of that, the more you look into the idea that trout can see color you’ll get many, many different answers. So many so, that you begin to wonder how anything works at all! With that being said, if the only thing they actually see is gray-scale, Then maybe to a trout The “Orange and black” above, that I tie and fish when October Caddis are out,looks like nothing more than a ton of legs, moving at a high rate of speed and making a commotion.

Book Reviews · Everything Else · Outdoor Wanderings

A great book to embrace your cabin fever and a few reflections on my so-called childhood ‘fort’. Book review:”Winter World. The ingenuity of animal survival”

When I started writing this, there was at least a foot of fresh snow on the ground with more in the forecast and the animals were heading back to doing whatever it is they do during this time of the year. Yet a week ago it was pushing 60 degrees in winter and I was in a t-shirt dreaming of small mouth bass fishing.

I began wondering if they were now suddenly confused. Did they animals start to think it was the beginnings of spring? Hungrily eating all of what they had stored in joy, hopping out of their shelter in anticipation that it was April. Only to find that when the temperature dropped to a chilly 10 degrees the next day, they would return to their barren dens, and immediately question those poor life decisions they made in haste? Or did they know better. Did they instinctively know that this was just a freak occurrence? Just a brief three day warm up so they can look for stale bagels and old french fries at the bottom of a parking lot dumpster in suburbia?